My Promised Land – facilitator’s guide

What do you need?

  • You need to have read the book yourself…
  • You need for everyone attending the discussion to have read the book (or up to the chapter you are discussing, in the 9-part series) – no short cuts!
  • You need to have worked through the guide, making decisions for yourself.
  • You are welcome to print out any of the materials you wish. You can also run the entire session carbon-free.
  • You need a quiet, well-lit room with comfortable seating for the discussion itself.
  • Set up a flip-chart or white board. (more…)

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My Promised Land – whole book structured discussion

Bettering or Battering?

A recurring theme in Shavit’s narrative is the difference, sometimes chasm, between intentions, actions, and results. 
  • What would you say were Shavit’s intentions in writing this book?
  • Did he succeed?
The Jewish community throughout the world tends to be suspicious of those who criticize Israel and Zionism. This may be because criticism can serve two opposing intentions. Sometimes criticism is a call for destruction, and sometimes criticism is a call for improvement and reconstruction. 
  • How would you classify “My Promised Land” – reconstructive? destructive? 
  • Do you believe Shavit’s intentions were towards construction or destruction? (more…)

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My Promised Land – working with the conversation units

The conversation units

We have created for you eight individual discussion units based on particular chapters of the book. You can work with these units in a nine-part series of meetings that culminate in the Whole Book Discussion, or you can work with the units as individual stand-alone modules.

For each discussion you will need

  • to have read the book yourself…
  • for everyone attending the discussion to have read the particular chapter under discussion AND Chapter One – At First Sight (this first chapter offers crucial context) – no short cuts!
  • You need to have worked through the guide, making decisions for yourself.
  • You are welcome to print out any of the materials you wish. You can also run the entire session carbon-free.
  • a quiet, well-lit room with comfortable seating for the discussion itself.
  • a flip-chart or white board. (more…)

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My Promised Land – Provocative Facilitation

Here are some of what we may call the principles of provocative facilitation, in no particular order:

  • Dialogue is not consensus
  • Comfort must be hard-won, not worshipped
  • Learning means going to visit
  • Push for “authentic speech”
  • We live with questions that can’t be answered (more…)

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First Conversation Chapter Two: Into the Valley, 1921

Precis
 

מפת ישראלThis chapter focuses specifically on the Harod valley, (the south eastern part of the Yizrael valley), populated by a few poor Arab villages before Zionism arrived there in the Autumn of 1921. For centuries the valley had been sparsely populated and lightly farmed. A place of brackish water and disease. Shavit describes the new situation of Eastern European Jews and of Zionism at the end of the First World War.  The crisis of the former had become much more acute and the forces awakening in the Zionist movement had responded with more radical and widespread solutions, including the idea of large scale settlement in the Yizrael (Jezreel) valley, a valley that resonated with Biblical memory. (more…)

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